OEB Seminars

Add to your calendar:

Next OEB Seminar:
 

May 23, 2018
  • OEB Sheena Cotter (Rose)
    Starts: 3:00 pm

    Location: Room 2402 Biocenter 3


 

Full program:
 

May 23, 2018
  • OEB Sheena Cotter (Rose)
    Starts: 3:00 pm

    Location: Room 2402 Biocenter 3


May 30, 2018
  • Daniel Hofius ( Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden)
    Starts: 12:00 am


  • OEB Seminar: Daniel Hofius (SLU Uppsala, Sweden) - Selective autophagy in plant immunity and disease
    Starts: 3:15 pm

    Location: Room 1041 Biocenter 2


    Description:

    Host: Michael Wrzaczek

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic and homeostatic process in eukaryotes that mediates the bulk or selective degradation of cytoplasmic content including individual and aggregated proteins, toxic compounds and damaged organelles. In animals, autophagy plays a paramount role in the immune response against intracellular pathogens, and several viruses and bacteria have evolved measures to counteract or even hijack autophagic processes to the benefit of infection. In plants, however, the functions and mechanisms of autophagy in host immunity and microbial pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, I will present our recent findings revealing anti- and pro-microbial roles of distinct autophagy pathways during bacterial and viral infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.
    We showed that the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) activates autophagy in an effector-dependent manner to remove proteasomes involved in the control of salicylic acid-dependent defense responses. In contrast to this probacterial “proteaphagy” pathway, the selective cargo receptor NBR1 counteracts bacterial proliferation and disease progression by suppressing the establishment of an aqueous intercellular space (“water-soaking”) crucial for virulence. Furthermore, we discovered that NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets the viral capsid protein and particles of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), thereby restricting the establishment of infection. This antiviral “xenophagy” seems to be counteracted by protective functions of autophagy-resistant CaMV inclusion bodies that sequester capsid proteins and coordinate particle assembly. Finally, we showed that NBR1-independent bulk autophagy promotes plant viability during infection and serves as a proviral mechanism to extend the timespan for virus production and potential CaMV transmission.
    Together, our studies demonstrate that NBR1-mediated selective autophagy is an integral part of the plant immune system in plants, and that bacterial and viral pathogens have developed sophisticated strategies to antagonize or exploit autophagy mechanisms for the establishment of disease. Current efforts to further dissect the mechanistic details of the pro- and antimicrobial functions of autophagy will be discussed.
    For more information about our research, please visit:
    •https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Hofius+D
    •https://www.slu.se/en/departments/plant-biology-forest-genetics/research/groups/daniel-hofius/
    •https://www.slu.se/en/ew-news/2018/4/how-bacteria-hijack-the-plants-self-eating-system-to-spread-infection/

June 6, 2018
  • Plant club: Biocentre 3, seminar room 2402, Viikinkaari 1 Jens Stougaard, University of Aarhus, Denmark Signals and receptors involved in endosymbiosis Host: Alan Schulman
    Starts: 3:00 pm


October 3, 2018
  • OEB Yvonne Buckley
    Starts: 3:00 pm